Jerusalem Studies in Arabic and Islam Guidelines for authors

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JSAI front cover

Front cover of JSAI 50 (2021)

Jerusalem Studies in Arabic and Islam

 

Guidelines for authors

These guidelines are meant to assist you in preparing your paper for publication in Jerusalem Studies in Arabic and Islam. Following them will ensure a smooth process of peer-review, production, and publication. Please adhere to the guidelines so that your paper matches the journal’s requirements. Please submit your paper in a Word for Windows format and PC compatible (please attach special fonts if used).

Please send your submission to msjsai@mail.huji.ac.il.

General information

Papers will be subject to double-blind peer-review by appropriate members of the Editorial Board or external evaluators selected at the Editor’s discretion. This means that manuscript authors do not know who the reviewers are, and that reviewers do not know the names of the authors. This process usually takes up to ten weeks. We will let you know whether your paper was accepted, rejected, or requires further revision. When submitting the revised version, please indicate your changes clearly and refer to the reviewers’ comments in detail.

Submitted articles should be 10,000–15,000 words (including footnotes).
Abstracts should be 150–200 words. Please include 5–7 keywords.

Please submit your paper in a Word for Windows format and PC compatible (please attach special fonts if used), accompanied by a PDF version identical to the Word file.

Details of all funding sources should be given in the first footnote.

If your paper includes images, illustrations, pictures, etc., that are not your own work, please check their copyright status. It is the author’s responsibility to obtain and clear all copyright related issues for such materials.

Please send all images and other graphical data in separate files. You may also include them in your paper as placement indicators, or you may include a written marker: [fig. 1 / table 1 / picture 1 here] at the required place.

 

  • The system used is that in which items are abbreviated in the footnotes throughout the article and written out in full in a bibliographical list at the end of the article.

 

  • Please abbreviate all references in the footnotes in the following manner:
  • Stern, Studies, pp. 23–37.
  • Al-Jabartī, ʿAjāʾib al-āthār, vol. 2, pp. 43–45.
  • Lev, Chipman, and Niessen, “Chicken and chicory are good for you,” p. 340.
  • Shinar, “Mawlid celebrations”, p. 375.

 

  • A complete bibliographical list must appear at the end of the article. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically; an initial a, an, the, or al- is ignored in the alphabetizing. Multiple entries by the same author are  arranged alphabetically (not chronologically).

 

  • Please compile the list according to the following guidelines:
Book:

Author’s last name, author’s first name. Book title. [Editor’s name.] [No. of vols.] City, year of publication.

  • Al-Jabartī, ʿAbd al-Raḥmān. ʿAjāʾib al-āthār fī al-tarājim wa-’l-akhbār. Shmuel Moreh, ed. 5 vols. Jerusalem, 2013.
  • Stern, Samuel M. Studies in early Ismāʿīlism. Jerusalem, 1983.
  • Yāqūt. Muʿjam al-buldān. Ferdinand Wüstenfeld, ed. 6 vols. Leipzig, 1866–1873.
  • Al-Zubayr b. Bakkār. Al-Akhbār al-muwaffaqiyyāt. Sāmī Makkī al-ʿĀnī, ed. Beirut: ʿĀlam al-Kutub, 1996/1416.
An article in a journal:

Author’s last name, author’s first name. “Article’s title.” Journal’s Title issue number (year of publication in parentheses): page numbers (numerals only).

  • Kister, Meir J. “Some reports concerning al-Tāʾif.” JSAI 1 (1979): 1–18.
  • Lev, Efraim, Leigh Chipman, and Friedrich Niessen. “Chicken and chicory are good for you: a unique family prescription from the Cairo Genizah (T-S NS223.82-83 ).” JSAI 35 (2008): 335–352.
  • Kilpatrick, Hilary. “Autobiography and classical Arabic literature.” Journal of Arabic Literature 22 (1991): 1–20
An article in a book:

Author’s last name, author’s initial(s). “Title of the article.” In editor’s initial(s) last name, ed. Book’s title. City, year, page numbers.

  • Shinar, Pessah. “Traditional and reformist mawlid celebrations in the Maghrib.” In Myriam Rosen-Ayalon, ed. Studies in memory of Gaston Wiet. Jerusalem, 1977, pp. 371–413.
  • Humphreys, R. Stephen. “Qurʾānic myth and narrative structure in early Islamic historiography.” In Frank M. Clover and R. Stephen Humphreys, eds. Tradition and innovation in late antiquity. Madison, 1989, pp. 271–290.
Book consisting of collected articles:

Editor’s last name, editor’s first name, [additional editors,] ed(s). Collection’s title. City, year of publication.

  • Ben-Shammai, Haggai, Shaul Shaked, and Sarah Stroumsa, eds. Exchange and transmission across cultural boundaries: philosophy, mysticism and science in the Mediterranean world. Jerusalem, 2013.
Encyclopaedia entry:

Author’s last name, author’s first name. “Entry’s title.” Encyclopaedia’s title, s.v.

  • Hawting, Gerald R. “Taḥannutth.” EI2, s.v.

 

  • Please note: with the exception of proper names, lower case letters should be used in all titles (books and articles).

 

  • Quotations from the Qurʾān: Please specify only sūra and āya number:
  • Qurʾān 33:3.

 

  • When citing excerpts from a source, the translation should precede the transliteration, which should be placed in parentheses:

“Have no doubts concerning your wife Maryam” (lā tartab bi-ḥalīlatika Maryam)

 

  • In Arabic titles, only the first word should be capitalized with the exception of proper names:
  • Ibn ʿAsākir, Taʾrīkh madīnat Dimashq.

 

  • Arabic numerals (rather than Roman numerals) should be used to designate volume numbers and should be followed by p./pp.:
  • Ibn Taymiyya, Majmūʿ fatāwā, vol. 35, p. 225.

 

  • Please supply both hijrī and Common Era dates (marked with BCE and CE). If only a hijrī date is given, it should be followed by AH:
  • 191/807 or 191 AH

 

  • When writing a book review, please cite at the top of the review the following details:

Author’s full name. Full title of the book under review. City: publisher, year of publication. Number of pages. ISBN number.

  • James R. Russell. Armenian and Iranian studies. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2004. 1462 pp. + xxix. ISBN 0-935411-19-4.

 

  • Transliteration should be full and consistent throughout the article. See the full transliteration table below.

 

Please note the following:

For Arabic:

No word-initial hamzas: al-amr

No sun letters: al-nūr

Compound names with Allāh are in general written as two words: ʿAbd Allāh

Contraction of al-: wa-ʼl-daftar, bi-ʼl-daftar, but li-l-bayt, fī al-bayt

Tāʾ marbūṭa is rendered -a: dawla; when in construct, it is rendered -at: dawlat al-nās. After a long vowel it is rendered -āt: ṣalāt

For Persian:

Eżāfa is transliterated -i after consonants; -yi after vowels.

The construct خوا should be transliterated khvā.

 

JSAI transliteration table – Arabic and Persian

 

 

Persian

Arabic

ا

ʾ, ā

ʾ, ā

ب

b

b

پ

p

-

ت

t

t

ث

th

th

ج

j

j

چ

č

-

ح

خ

kh[2]

kh

د

d

d

ذ

dh

dh

ر

r

r

ز

z

z

ژ

ž

-

س

s

s

ش

sh

sh

ص

ض

ż

ط

ظ

ع

ʿ

ʿ

غ

gh

gh

ف

f

f

ق

q

q

ك

k

k

گ

g

-

ل

l

l

م

m

m

ن

n

n

ه

h, -a (at the end of a word)

h

و

v, ū

w, ū

ي

y, ī

y, ī

ة

-

-a, -āt (after a long vowel), -at (in construct)

 
Bibliography example

Humphreys, “Qurʾānic myth and narrative structure”

Humphreys, R. Stephen. “Qurʾānic myth and narrative structure in early Islamic historiography.” In Frank M. Clover and R. Stephen Humphreys, eds. Tradition and innovation in late antiquity. Madison, 1989, pp. 271–290.

 

Al-Jabartī, ʿAjāʾib al-āthār

Al-Jabartī, ʿAbd al-Raḥmān. ʿAjāʾib al-āthār fī al-tarājim wa-’l-akhbār. Shmuel Moreh, ed. 5 vols. Jerusalem, 2013.

 

Kister, “Some reports”

Kister, Meir J. “Some reports concerning al-Tāʾif.” JSAI 1 (1979): 1–18.

 

Lev, Chipman, and Niessen, “Chicken and chicory are good for you”

Lev, Efraim, Leigh Chipman, and Friedrich Niessen. “Chicken and chicory are good for you: a unique family prescription from the Cairo Genizah (T-S NS223.82-83 ).” JSAI 35 (2008): 335–352.

 

Shinar, “Mawlid celebrations”

Shinar, Pessah. “Traditional and reformist mawlid celebrations in the Maghrib.” In Myriam Rosen-Ayalon, ed. Studies in memory of Gaston Wiet. Jerusalem, 1977, pp. 371–413.

 

Stern, Studies

Stern, Samuel M. Studies in early Ismāʿīlism. Jerusalem, 1983.

 

Yāqūt. Muʿjam al-buldān

Yāqūt. Muʿjam al-buldān. Ferdinand Wüstenfeld, ed. 6 vols. Leipzig, 1866–1873.

[2] The construct خوا should be transliterated khvā.